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part of this great country of ours, every region, small town, large city, rural areas. but there is something that binds the americans together that i believe is unique among the nations of the earth, and we are celebrating a part of that you need this today. and so, as we contemplate the future, let us remember that god has not given us the spirit of fear, but of power and of love and of a sound mind. thank you. >> thank you, governor strickland. i now ask for a motion to designate the secretary of state as the ex-officio secretary. >> i moved jon husted be designated as the ex-officio secretary of the 53rd electoral college. >> moving that mr. husted be designated. all those in favor by saying aye. opposed? ayes have it. mr. secretary, will you please return to the podium. we electors are about to cast our votes for president of the united states. the procedures are set forth in the 12th amendment of the united states constitution. separate votes are to be taken for each of us on separate ballots. after the votes have been cast and counted and the results announced,
're seeing most of the growth in large cities. >> what about this gift from random house to all of its employees. pretty nice. >> yes, call it 50 shades of green, if you will. random house, which is the publisher of "50 shades of grey," the lascivious adult novel that's been all the rage this year, the company has seen major uptick in large part because of the book and soars. the ceo announced this week at the holiday party that every one of the employees will get a $5,000 bonus this year. that's really great news especially in the world of publishing, which has been sort of on a downward death spiral. >> that's really nice for them. well, great. thank you very much. morgan brennan. >> in today's one-minute play back. governor chris christie on "the daily show" the universal telethon for hurricane sandy victims and about meeting the boss bruce springsteen back stage. >> he came up, put his hands down. shook his hand. i tried to be cool. i wasn't. then he said, come on, give me a hug. i said, all right. i hugged him. >> did he go, come on, stop. >> no. you know, that's always hard to ju
in this country. we've done it in new york. this is the safest big city in the country. there are other large cities that are making real inroads against gun violence, but at the local level mayors and governors can't do it without leadership at the federal level, and, again, the passion and the comforting words from the president, they're important, but they're not nearly as important as the kind of leadership that he and congressman larson, his colleagues in congress, need to demonstrate now to get something done. >> congressman, before we go, i have to ask you, what factor do you think contributes the most to moving the ball forward on this? is it greater coverage in the media? is it more leadership from our politicians? what do you need to see to push for gun control reform in congress? >> well, clearly, clearly, it's all of the above, but most importantly, it's leadership from our elected officials. we are elected with a responsibility and a charge, and we have an obligation to speak out. if this were a terrorist attack and, frankly, i think these are domestic acts of terrorism. we would
ranked among the worst in the nation, even though the district was spending more per pupil than large u.s. cities, almost $13,000 per student. but in 2009, washington, d.c. became first in the nation to tie teacher salaries to student test scores under a program called "impact." teachers rated highly effective can get annual bonuses up to $25,000 if they stay at that achievement level for two straight years, they can also get a base salary increase of $20,000. a highly effective teacher can earn $76,000, the first year, and reach $131,000 in just nine years. less effective teachers earn 51,000 to start and are fired if they get poor involveses for two straight years. this year, 98 teachers were fired for poor performance. but nathan saunders, president of the washington teachers union, says the system is unfair to teachers when many of their student have barriers to learning, such as poverty. >> the penalties are so immediate and so painful, not just immediate in terms of their paycheck, but also immediate in terms of their careers. >> reporter: in washington, test scores are still amon
of this great country of ours, every region, small-town, large city, rural areas. but there is something that binds the americans together that i believe is unique among the nation's of the earth, and we are celebrating a part of that you need this today. and so, as we contemplate the future, let us remember that god has not given us the spirit of fear, but of power and of love and of a sound bite. thank you. -- and of a sound mind. thank you. >> thank you, governor strickland. i now ask for a motion to designate the secretary of state as the ex-officio official. >> i moved jon hustend be designated as the axle official secretary of the 53rd electoral college. bemoving that mr. husted designated. all those in favor by seeing aye. opposed? ayes have it. secretary, will you please return to the podium. we elect torrors are about to ct our votes for president of the united states. the procedures are set forth in the 12th amendment. separate of votes are to be taken for each of us on separate ballots. after the votes have been cast and counted and the results announced come electors will sig
highest violent crime rate of any middle to large-sized city in the country. so you've got a couple things here. you have chosen a path. you said you know what? we like the idea that the democrats are giving to us and you have gone down this path for 50 years and you have nothing to show for it but despair. a bailout is not going to solve your problem. think about what you are doing when you go to vote. would a bailout be a gift, with someone saying straighten your life out now. stuart: i agree with you. this is surely a larger picture here. if detroit wants it and appeals to the president to get some money because they voted for the president, what about california? what about illinois? what about any other of the states which voted overwhelmingly for president obama and are in dire financial shape? it could open the door. quick comment? sandra: absolutely. i think this could be the big change over the next four years, if you hear more cries for help, and they don't get it, maybe that's when the republican party starts to look pretty good. stuart: that will be interesting. next we will sh
the wind and rain. city crews work into the night cutting tree that toppled as a this tree started making cracking noises at 5:00 a.m. in front of rob porter's home. >> and then there was a large -- probably five minutes after the crack lig, a huge thud. >> in all the department of public works cleaned up the trees. it is real busy. >> this latest storm spared no neighborhood. it was snapped near moraga street. there was sig president cay -- significant street flooding. two large branches landed on one of the thoroughfares. and in city heights, a tree uprooted taking part of the street with it. a prius on the street was also damaged. >> you can replace a car, and some of the streets have been here 80 years. >> despite the loss of some trees, the city says as little property damage and no injuries. although at this home, the family dog did come close to getting hurt. a large tree belonging to the house two doors down came crashing down on their backyard. >> i was thankful it didn't land on my dog. that would be tragic. i am glad he ran. he has big, long legs so he could run. >> the departm
of debris from drainage pipe that carry storm water to the lower level of the city. trying to prevent a large back that up could unleash a torrent of potentially destructive water. >> more than anything we have seen in the last 15 years. saturation levels in the hillside creating a lot of flow throughout the lower levels. >>reporter: nearby there has been a nagging flow of water through frank hererra sky light into the kitchen. >> call the contractor hope to get him over here next day to see what he has to say and hopefully they can order up a new part. the tarp is coming. before the next storm definitely. >>reporter: only kern boulevard they scrape out junk and the metal great id that goes that the station. >> gets full of grass and clean it tout make sure the pump able to run. >>reporter: the pump take all the run off from city streets and flush it into the bay. willow tree topple on hillside on valley view avenue. wasn't particularly big but the branches may have created a natural dam lead ing into a drain pipe. >> always looks better than a fallen down tree. they just recent
and privilege it is to serves as the transportation director in this great city. we ordered san francisco weather to deep the dust down and we are in a construction site and it's a great time for transportation across the nation largely because of some of the folks you will hear who are to my left and your right. it is also a great time to be in san francisco because we have leadership here in the city that are encouraging innovation, that recognize the importance of investment and infrastructure, and there is no better manifestation of that than this project and that prt is man manifested in a way that i can see no more strongly in our great mayor who have been been a public works director, a city administrator, and helped build the city's plan he really gets this stuff. he is really engaged in this stuff. i don't think a week has come gone by that he hasn't asked me when this day is coming and it's a pleasure to introduce our mayor ed lee. >> thank you for your wonderful leadership. over 20-25 years ago when we were struggling with the earthquake, when people in chinatown
the next two years, large sections of kansas city on both the kansas and missouri sides will be wired. >> this is exactly what you guys wanted. >> exactly. that's exactly it. we want local entrepreneurs to take advantage of the faster seed that google fiber will bring and develop. you know, the sky is the limit. >> and how high is that? even the tech wizards aren't sure. >> you know, we've been asked that question a few times. the truthful answer is we don't know yet. now we have a new technology that no one else has in the nation, and it can take our business to a new height that we didn't even dream of. >> the practical effects are easier to predict. better property values, more reasons for investment, for top talent to come, stay. how much impact can all of this have on your city? >> i think at the end of the day, if you ask any mayor growing that small business, finding an aunt ru pentrepreneu to take a risk and do that in your community is going to grow jobs and grow the economy. >> for now, dreams are driving wild on the silicon prairie. tom foreman, cnn, kansas city, kansas. >>
joins us in new york city. so what is going on here, jamie? >> reporter: there are large concerns and it is pretty serious why we're talking about it again. martha, it has been already five days and there is no sign of this 11-year-old cancer patient known only as emily but authorities haven't given up hope. they have actually expanded their search and making clear that time is not on their side. take a look at this. this is a snippet of surveillance video they're working with, showing emily inside the phoenix children's hospital where she has been treated for lukemia a day before her scheduled discharge. you see her without a wig and iv pole. her mom puts her in different clothes and disguise that allowed her to go undedected outside the hospital as police are describes an as black van. a alert nurse quickly contacted 911. the catheter in emily's heart, doctors say, if it becomes infected could have deadly consequences. the little girl had one arm amputated from a previous infection. >> i can tell you we have searched for these, location of these individuals, both locally and out
is in the community development block grant. that is a block grant that cities use largely. it is very flexible. they can use it to help in their recovery efforts in the most flexible way possible host: new mexico has two air force bases, two national research allowance, and many folks are dependent on federal money for work and assistance programs. for her. -- it will hurt. , democratic caller. caller: explain the logic behind what taxing one of our biggest corporations, which is the religious work -- religious churches and all of that that make $10 trillion a year. and also, how come medicare pays for -- i think it is $1 billion now -- a formula enhancement drugs. that is a pleasure, not a need. -- for male enhancement drugs. that is a pleasure, not a need. host: independent caller, go ahead. caller: i would like to bring up the point that you have brought of the federal portion of the moneys and the money does not go -- come out of nowhere. that is the tax dollars, or has been borrowed, were printed. that money is not without cost. i would like to have your opinion on that. thet: you're refe
, large sections of kansas city on both the kansas and missouri sides will be wired. >> this is salt lake what you wanted. >> exactly -- this is exactly what you guys wanted. >> exactly. we want to take advantage of the faster speeds that google fire will bring and develop. the sky's the limit. >> reporter: how high is that? even the tech wizards aren't sure. >> you know, we've been asked that question a few times. the truthful answer is we don't know yet. we have a new technology that no one else has in the nation, and it can take our business to a new height that we didn't even dream of. >> reporter: the practical effects are easier to predict. better property values, more reasons for investment for top talent to come and stay. how much impact can all of this have on your city? >> i think at the end of the day if you ask any mayor growing that small business, finding that entrepreneur, willing to take a risk in your community is going to grow jobs and ultimately the economy. >> reporter: for now, dreams are growing wild out on the silicon prairie. tom foreman, cnn, kansas city, kansas.
to hold on to customers. >> here in the u.s., we've seen circuit city, the electronics store, borders, the bookstore, go out of business. largely because of competition with amazon. >> reporter: based in seattle, amazon was started in the mid-'90s to sell books online. and for years made no profit. but it soon became clear that founder jeff bezos and his notoriously secretive company had bigger plans. they started expanding in the late 1990s into videos, music, games, electronics, kitchenware, clothing, shoes, jewelry, business services, information storage. amazon turned the corner to profitability in 2002, and today, amazon is a $100 billion global company. and though bezos declined our request for an interview, he recently told "fortune" magazine's andy serwer -- >> our goal is to be the most customer obsessed company. is there someone doing some element better than we? if so, how do we improve? >> online shopping is still only 10% of total retail. >> reporter: meaning amazon in all likelihood is just getting started. ben stein told me recently he has never seen a company dominate
.m. at city hall, we will be celebrating with all of our schools and school communities, teachers, parents, principals, the fact that sfusd is one of only two large urban school systems in the state of california to have surpassed the 800 api mark. [ applause ] so we're tremendously proud of our students and teachers and communities and principals. so we're going to get together and celebrate. and we're going to celebrate that, but we're also going to recognize schools that are on the move, schools that are closing the achievement gap for african-american and latino students and those with growth. so there will be lots of celebrating going on and we're going to recommitment to closing the achievement gap. because, as much as we're going to celebrate, we're also going to be very clear about the fact that we have a long way to go, but that we have the right people on the bus and the bus is heading in the right direction and we're going to add some gas to the bus on thursday. so we want to invite everybody to come and join us. >> can i just one thing? i just want to recognize the district
, large like new york city, was pounded and pounded and pounded by this devastating hurricane. all america watched, we all held our breath, we all feared the worst, and we saw the worst. and, at the same time, we saw the indomitable spirit of the american people hanging onto their home, praying for their livelihood, and while all that was going on and the president visited, the governors on both sides of the aisle, to say you've got the united states of america behind you. well, the united states of america being behind you, whether you're governor o'malley or governor christie or governor cuomo or the other goafns means that we -- governors means that we need to pass this bill, and we want to pass it because we know that lives were devastated and livelihoods were ruined. in maryland, gosh, we faced these unique challenges -- hurricanes, blizzards, urban and rural communities affected. and our own lower shore, some somerset county was hit. that has one of the highest unemployment rates in the city -- in the state, close to 10%. 18% of the residents moved below a line of 35 $$35,000 a year.
seen a dramatic drop in litter 0 around the city. san jose officials say their next goal is to eliminate polystyrene foam. they plan to present the city warmest to the city council in february to phase out foam boxes for large established starting in 2014 and small restaurants in 2015. >> the specific gun club may not be evicted after all the board of supervisors are expected to vote on the matter tomorrow. the city voted to of the to the club back in july after the estimated soil cleanup costs of the site would be $10.5 million. but during the eviction process, the club reached a deal for a month- to-month lease with the city. the gun club has been at this location for nearly 80 years. >> members of nasa's curiosity team are expected to give an update of its mission to mars today at noon. --the announcement will be delivered here in san francisco at the annual fall meeting of the american geophysical union. rumors about a big discovery began after curiosity's sciences was quoted as saying that a rover instrument responsible for finding inorganic compounds had gathered da
with my tent city and that i'm a racist and i break up families and i just go after brown people many of the children focussed in large part of arizona's show me your papers low believed to be one of if strictest measures in imbrags in the country. the sheriff said he would have liked to explain he doesn't make the law, only enforces it. the school district cancelled the meeting saying due to scheduling it would not work for him to speak with children. >> the sheriff says he doesn't think scheduling is the issue. >> i don't know what their agenda is. i'm sure it may have gone up the line and someone said you're not going to have that sheriff in our school the school district can ask him to respond to the children in a letter that they can read. he said the rejection didn't surprise him. he has been turned down after e agreeing to speak in his own county and elsewhere. >> the city of richmond is looking into allegations that wung of the top officials misused resources. leslie knight is accused of using public employees and facilities to use a side business of selling party favors a
to you on the highway. >>> one of the bay area's largest countes is sending large shopping bags to pasture as the new year begins on tuesday and applies to alameda counties and all of the cities. they will note longer be able to give customers one-time use plastic bags. instead, pay a dime for each recyclable paper bag used and similar laws are already in affect in san jose, san francisco and dozens of other california cities and counties. and since its ban took affect, the number of plastic bags littering city streets went down 59%. >> who counsels that stuff? >> i don't know. >>> 58%. 50million experience. >>> some local transis a -- transit agencies are offering free rides for those people wanting free rides tomorrow night. >> and? san francisco, fireworks will go off along the embarcadero. and they have free rides at 11:00 p.m. with later service only for southbound trains and muni will offer free rides with some lines running later than usual and for partiers in sill cop valley, all vta light bus and light rail is free between 7:00 p.m. and 4:00 a.m. and there will be exte
for several minutes. now, a coastal city did report a three-foot high tsunami. but no large waves. there have been several aftershocks. a couple of 5.0 tremors as well. >>> a man suffered serious injuries after surning around 30 feet after the oakland raider game. christien kafton is live at the coliseum and has been getting reaction from fans and has new information. >> reporter: we have new information, whether this individual fell or jumped. right now, oakland police are treating this as an accidental fall. let's show you the seen. we do know that that fan fell from -- we do know the fan fell from the third level of that concourse down to the lower level here. we've also learned the fall was on the outside of the stadium. so you are looking at the exact areaor the exact type of fall that individual would have taken. that's somewhere between 30 to 50 feet. oakland police told me that they estimated -- estimated that fall between 0 feet. he fell during the -- during the raiders and broncos' game. there were some conflicting reports over this, whether this individual jumped or fell. that inci
if his center is closed under state law neighborhood grocery stores large and small will have to pick up the slack or face fines. this resident says it would be a mistake for the city to close the center. >> it's very convenient for the neighborhood. i like the idea of being able to recycle. >>reporter: but after years of legal wrangling it appears time is up. eviction notice is now in effect. hank supporters rallied at city hall today hoping for a miracle. but according to the sheriff's department the departure is imminent. >> we are confident that at least hopeful that they are going to vacate the premises voluntarily. >>reporter: if not he says there will be a forced eviction by the end of the first week in january. in san francisco, at city hall, carolyn tyler, abc 7 news. >>> all right. it's that time of year. just ahead. nominee are out for the first major film arrest ward of the season. list our don sanchez played a role in compiling. >> plus. my god my god. caught on video. scary moments for one family as they watch for one family as they watch the +1 >>. >> nominee
24 last year. the city has seen a decrease in the number of other violent crimes, like attempted murder and assault. a detective says the drop is largely due to richmond's increased police force. the department has again from 40 officers to 190 in recent years. >>> 5:57. next, can lawmakers broker an 11th hour deal to keep the country from falling off the fiscal cliff? important meetings set to begin in hours. >>> vodka bottle credited with thwarting this stick-up tempt. we'll show you the dramatic video. >>> and michael finney gives your new year's resolution to drop weight a jumpstart. we'll put >>> last day of 2012, good morning i'm katie marzullo in for eric thomas. >>> and i'm kristen sze. clear, beautiful weather. >>> check it out right here, boom, that is clear, no radar returns no rain, the only thing you are going to find is a little frost on the ground this morning because of the chilly temperatures. a few high clouds from time to time, definitely a bright day. off to a chilly start around the bay 34 to 44, 44 in san francisco, the warm spot. by noon, [ inaudible ]
on things. he loved being provocative. he largely created the new york city we now know, certainly the point of view. it inspired me because i have always looked up to people who sea change taking place and look at that as an opportunity instead of a threat. a couple of years before he died, i went to see him. he died about five years ago. he was at berkeley and at the time in his late 70's. he was running the graduates' magazine program at uc. he had serious cancer. it was very hard to understand him. he was still so excited about the student projects. he spent the entire morning taking me through these magazines his graduate students had created. he was an optimist and passionate about his work right to the end. it was also very instructive to recognize it is not work if you love what you do. >> let me follow-up on that. you have spoken about how you have never taken the easy path. you are drawn to where the heat is. that takes a tremendous amount of courage. why are you drawn to that? >> i do not know the answer completely except that i grew up as the oldest daughter and oldest granddaugh
of this country's labor movement. in 1960, flint was michigan's second largest city 200,000 people. it also had a vibrant middle class, it's public school system was a model for the nation and that was due in large part to the strength of its labor unions and the large number of manufacturing workers living in flint. they took over a factory and they didn't leave until they reached a deal with management. workers occupied several general motor's plants. not for a day, a week but for month -- actually for longer than a month for 40-consecutive days and it worked. they got bargaining rights, and 40-hour workweek and a minimum wage. they had 100,000 people turned out in detroit to show their support for the striking workers in flint 100,000 people. and yesterday, 12,000 people turned out in lancing, michigan to protest against the state's new right to work law. it's a devastating blow to the heart of organized labor in this country, and perhaps no one knows more about than that that garl dean blankinship. >> my father called home one night, he was working on the second shift.
on the south side of the city of chicago. and i am a pastor of my church. i am here to support hr 308. the large capacity ammunition device act which i have been a co-sponsor of since march of last year. hearing reports that there are 264,000 -- rifles manufactured each year in the u.s. and of those a 5,443 are exported overseas and 248,000 are used right here in the u.s. a bitter irony that we are confronted with at sandy hook is that the firearm industry's association their headquarters are located just across the highway from the sandy hook elementary school and while focusing on large capacity weapons is important, i also have a bill, hr 66 a. legislation aimed at establishing a nationwide system for prohibiting unlicensed gun ownership and granting the u.s. attorney general broader authority on the program. as sad as the sandy hook incident is for all of us, we must be cognizant of the fact that gun violence has been terrorizing neighborhoods in chicago, detroit, houston, washington washington, d.c. for over decades now. one of my local newspapers, the "chicago tribune," reports
, keep the creeks clear of garbage and when they do see garbage piling up to give city officials a call and this situation they say was just too late. amy hollyfield, abc7 news. >>> road crews will be out today trying to make sure they are repairing a large pothole on highway 4 in pittsburg and that repair work is holding. the gave flat tires to drivers yesterday morning. at one point there was a line of cars with flats from that pothole. one driver told us, 25 cars were waiting to get fix. >>> people in live in a vallejo mobile home park are back home this morning. under water as a creek overflowed. there were whitewater rapids through the middle of that park forcing residents to move to higher ground. this morning the water receded things are still muddy. no injuries. the storm watch continues here, stay with you can track the rainy time with live doppler 7 hd at abc7news.com. >>> bart says its computer system should be up and running normally this morning following a power outage that shutdown the system twice, knocking out bart's main system yesterday some were stranded an hour befo
-presidential protesters in tahrir square. in other parts of the city, about two miles from here, as many as 200,000 protesters turned out. these are people who support president morsi. many of them from the muslim brotherhood. a large number were bussed in from rural areas in egypt. many carrying the koran and shouting, god is the law. it was a real show of force and show of public support by those who support egypt's new president. he also announced there will be a constitutional referendum on december 15. it came really after a vote on friday pushing through that constitution in one day. now the nation will have the chance to vote up or down on that constitution. president morsi said the extreme powers he declared for himself last week would end when that constitution is ratified. perhaps in just two weeks' time. it's not clear that's going to be enough for the protesters behind me, some of whom intend to sleep on the square until they drive president morsi from power. rick, back to you. >> rick: steve streaming live from cairo. thanks. >> arthel: closer to home, our neighbor to the south swe
' promotional film foretold everything from nuclear power plants that would light up cities to new and improved means of transportation. >> while nuclear power in locomotives, submarines, ships and even very large airplanes may all but revolutionize future transportation on land, sea and air. >> osgood: on december 2, 1957, 15 years to the day after that chain reaction in chicago, americans first commercial nuclear power plant opened in shippingport pennen. >> this plant has a secure place in american history. it is the first of the world's large-scale nuclear power stations exclusively devoted to peaceful purposes. >> osgood: today with just over 100 plants across the united states producing roughly 20% of our electricity, the nuclear industry's future stands at a cross roads. >> evacuation. please stay indoors with your windows closed. >> reporter: opponents of new plant construction point to the leak at pennsylvania's three mile island in 1979, to the soviet reactor meltdown in chernobyl in 1986 and to the fukushima disaster in japan after last year's earthquake and tsunami. supporters count
for the design of washington city. americans were not having a palace. it was not particularly all inspiring. in 1821 a european diplomat told congress that it was neither large nor khatami inspiring -- often inspiring -- awe inspiring. perhaps some president would be inclined to become the permanent resident if it were. >> niki goldberg has gathered some of her favorite white house photos. watch on sunday evening. eastern and space -- eastern and pacific. >> my inspiration was the idea that i wanted to explain how it happened. we do know the story of the cold war. we know the documents, we have seen the archives that describe the relationships between roosevelt, stalin, churchill, and truman. we know the main events from our point of view. what i wanted to do was show it from a different angle, from the ground up, what did it feel like to be one of the people subjected to this system. how did people make choices in that system? how did they react? one of the things that happened since 1989 is that the region called eastern europe has become very differentiated. these countries no longer hav
in the streets of our cities. it doesn't belong where it can be picked up easily by a grievance killer who can walk into a workplace, a mall, a theate and now an elementary school and kill large numbers. >> ifill: explain to our viewers what you are planning to introduce have changed what happened in newtown connecticut >> well, over time that weapon would be much less available. what we're trying to do is ban the sale, the manufacture, the transfer, the importation of assault weapons. it gets quite technical. i won't go into that right now. granather weapons that people already have. subject those weapons either to licensing or to a trigger lock. and spell out those grandfathered weapons which would be over 900 in the bill so nobody can say, oh, we took our... their hunting weapon away. then i'd be able to say here's your hunting weapon. it's specifically exempted in the bill. >> ifill: we're talking about prospective law, not one... >> that's right, that's right. it would ban approximately 100 weapons by actual name. and then weapons by physical characteristics. >> ifill: let's talk about th
the battle that is on. they are better equipped, they have taken large parts of the northern part of the country, and they are also beginning to tighten around a lot of the central syrian cities, including damascus and trying to go all the way in videotapes, they said that they were going to go to bashar al-assad's house. the russians are changing their tune a little bit. the russians only foreign enable poor. one of the reasons they have been so locked up with they are thinking they want to keep their port. the russians are not the only one involved. lots of people sending weapons into syria. you have a war going on with the wrong, on the other side, you have weapons coming from saudi arabia and qatar in turkey and that is what is supplying the rebels in the civil war that is continuing to rage on. both of those don't really have a lot to gain. they have a lot to lose. their side loses, they will lose a lot. as long as the syrians are willing to keep killing each other in this process, so far the syrian civil war has now claimed 44,000 lives. many people believe there really no m
. they designed washington city. there was competition. he designed a design for a palace. it was not particularly awe- inspiring. in fact, a european diplomat told congress it was neither large or awe-inspiring. but the answer the congressman gave was the building serves its purpose. it is larger and more elegant. photo mer new york times bodh critic on the white house. watch it on sunday on c-span three on "american history tv per." >> congressman steve scalise and jim jordan. >> thank you for coming. to delighted to welcome you a presentation by the outgoing and incoming chairman of the republican study committee of the u.s. congress. we are privileged to host this event and welcomed the incoming chairman and to think the outgoing chairman for their service. this is a special friendship between aei and the republican committee. we have cultivated something that is very rewarding for us. it is unusual to have an event like this regarding the ingoing and outgoing leaders for any organization. the nature of these leaders makes it more likely than what we would see with -- them with other organizat
festivals' columbus, ohio they used the money to buy an underwater machinery. host: and in the kansas city, they purchased in bomb detection -- a bomb detection robots despite already having two. it sat largely unused and was brought back on line are high schoolers. let's go to our first caller. from the breezy and appeared -- from louisiana. caller: the u.s. territories, do they applied to them guest: they apply to all of federated territories as well. in some areas, there are statutory minimum amounts that have to be provided to those territories. host: if you like to join the conversation and talked to david maurer about a homeland security grants to states, here are the numbers to call. what formula did the grant programs follow went looking to get out the money? what do they have to do? guest: it varies from program to program, but generally speaking, as a first cut, dhs takes into consideration the risk. in other words, it wants to provide the money more toward portions of the country where there is a greater risk of attack or natural disaster. secondly, we look at capabilities. how
are not ordering evacuations as of this time for any parts of the city. we're making that decision based on the nature of this storm. although we're expecting a large surge of water, it is not expected to be a tropical storm or hurricane-type surge. with this storm we'll likely see a slow pile-up of water rather than a sudden surge which is what you would expect from a hurricane and which we saw with irene 14 months ago. so it will be less dangerous but make no mistake about it, there will be a lot of water and low-lying areas will experience flooding. jon:. jenna: what was he supposed to do there? if national hurricane center wasn't saying it was hurricane what was he going to do. >> meteorologists were pulling our hair out. we were saying for a week this was epic storm. i don't know what information he was going with. the fact there were no hurricane watches and warnings may have played into him downplaying it. later on he started to say this is serious situation. that was two days before the storm hit. we were saying a week before this would be a big deal. jenna: interesting to see ho
as a replacement. >>> they ignored warnings that a large hurricane could hit the big apple. a 2,006 report said it was a question of time before hurricane came and flooded the system and caused wide outages in new york city. those warnings went unheeded due to concerns about budget cuts and the likelihood of such a storm. hurricane sandy is the second costliest disaster in u.s. history. >>> they had the first hack-a-thon. they worked on ideas yesterday afternoon. the goal was to create fun and practical apps using public information available through county records. >> we have seen interesting ideas around restaurant inspections. and we have seen ideas around places like parks. parks and rec information was interesting to people. >>> the grand prize winners made an app called book it and they took home a $3,000 prize. >>> there appears to and growing backlash against the new logo for the university of california system. more than 25,000 people have signed an on line petition at change.org to review the new design which made its debut friday. some say it is undignified. the new design is not rep
governments both large and small, the state of new york city dwovet -- government and so many others that are waiting to see if they will get some relief sew they can move tor ward with their plans. we beat back host of the crippling amendments. we beat back all of the crippling amendments an most of the amendments -- and most of the amendments. it's a very, very trying day, i think, for the senate. the century old tradition of different parts of the country rallying to help those that are beleaguered because of the difficult natural disasters continuing and the fact that 12 republicans voted for a bill that contain virtually no offsets except for the one amendment that passed last week. that is a full bill, a whole bill, a bill that gets new york and new jersey rapidly on the road to recovery fills us with hope that we can get something done and get something done quickly. when we press, when we explain to our colleagues what we needed and the desperation in here, they listened carefully. and we're really very, very glad about that. let me say a few specific things. there is very am
of hartford. 60 miles outside of new york city. a decent sized town, population about 27,000. but the school district itself has about 5400 kids. it's a pretty large district. this school in particular, kindergarten through fourth grade as the wnyw helicopter moves closer to that town. alisyn: it's sandy hook elementary school. about that town it's a very, very pretty town. it has a lot of beautiful town squares, churches on corners with pretty old steeples. parts of it are historic. it shows that this sort of terror parents experience everywhere, sadly. this story happens everywhere and you can just imagine how parents are feeling as they are getting this news that something apparently has happened at this school today, and there were gunshots, and that someone is hurt, but beyond that it is hard to know if all the students are okay. we wish we could report that, but at this hour we don't have that information. bill: crime is very few to this town, very low. one violent criminal offense in 2010 is are being reported in newtown, connecticut. okay, we're working through this. we'll be on the
. jordanian officials say it was first coordinated bombings at large shopping malls in ayman. almost simultaneously, machine gun and bomb attacks on cafe and hotels frequented by diplomats and tourists. with the city's police responding to those attacks, jordanian officials say the terrorists plan to launch the main assault on the u.s. embassy in amman. it's one of america's biggest embassies in the world. tom sanderson says the motivation for the attack was to show p capability. >> to inflict damage on the united states, inflict damage, physical and reputational, on the jordanian government in an environment in which all other governments are certainly dealing with their own difficulties right now. >> reporter: all 11 suspects were rounded up by jordanian security forces in mid october. jordanian officials say they'd planned to strike on november 9th, the seventh anniversary of the last al qaeda attack in jordan. when suicide bombers struck three hotels in amman, killing about 60 people. the man who claimed responsible for that attack was al zarqawi who led the group al qaeda in ira
because states and cities are obligated to pay all those benefits, or make another deal with their employees, which can often be quite bruising. at the federal level, a large stability thinking this too will change as we get into some of the government spending we've been talking about. but so far, the federal government has stayed pretty steady. host: one person saying i was hired one year ago, took 14 months of nonstop applications that generated few interviews, now thriving at work. he's age 63. guest: that's a terrific story and is great to hear. this is one person out of the 146,000 in any given month, i guess you might say. that is nice counterpoint to people who just want to collect unemployment until it runs out. and jobs are materializing. there's too few of them, no doubt about it, but they're there. business leaders will sort of breathe a sigh of relief and in 201 start to hire more. host: and show the viewers at home, a story in the financial times, they can read it for themselves, the construction ability, specifically home builders. lack of workers stops bu
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